Church Tradition and the Marginalization of Women

Jesus didn’t do it. Paul didn’t do it. None of the Apostles did it. Organized religion did it. In the 2,000 years since the Apostolic era, institutional religion has been on a power grab. The thing about a power grab is that those without the power get marginalized and/or abused while those with the power gain more power and control. That’s been the case with women in the church. Jon Zens notes,

The retrogression that occurred with reference to women in the post-apostolic age can be compared to what happened in other doctrinal and practical areas. For example, the Lord’s Supper was transformed from a time of the brethren remembering the Lord in a meal together to an elaborate “Holy Sacrament” officiated over by a clergyman. The monumental difference, however, between such things as the Lord’s Supper and what happened to women was that half of the church was rendered inferior and marginalized for nearly two millennia. Jon Zens, What’s with Paul and Women: Unlocking the Cultural Background to 1 Timothy 2 Ekklesia Press, 2010, p. 53. Kindle Edition.

Jacques Ellul adds this to the conversation,

All that represented weakness or inferiority [physical, social, etc.] was put in second place. Women are the most spectacular instance of this. After a period of independence that came with the spread of Christianity, they were relegated to a lower order…[ T] he more feminine liberty was suppressed, the more women were accused (of being the temptress of Genesis, etc.), [and] the more they were reduced to Continue reading “Church Tradition and the Marginalization of Women”

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